Bone Grafting

With the ability to grow bone where needed we can place implants of proper length and width, restoring functional and aesthetic appearance.

bonegraft2Need A Dental Implant but Not Enough Bone?

  • Bone grafting is often closely associated with dental restorations such as bridge work and dental implants.
  • In the majority of cases, the success of a restoration procedure can hinge on the height, depth, and width of the jawbone at the implant site.
  • When the jawbone associated with missing teeth shrinks, or has sustained significant damage, the implant(s) cannot be supported on this unstable foundation and bone grafting is usually recommended for the ensuing restoration.

Causes for Jaw Bone Volume Shrinkage

  • Periodontal Disease – Periodontal disease can affect and permanently damage the jaw bone that supports the teeth. Affected areas progressively worsen until the teeth become unstable.
  • Tooth Extraction – Studies have shown that patients who have experienced a tooth extraction subsequently lose 40-60% of the bone surrounding the extraction site during the following three years. Loss of bone results in what is called a “bone defect”.
  • Injuries and Infections – Dental injuries and other physical injuries resulting from a blow to the jaw can cause the bone to recede. Infections can also cause the jaw bone to recede in a similar way.

Bone grafting can repair implant sites with inadequate bone structure due to previous extractions, gum disease or injuries. The bone is either obtained from a tissue bank or your own bone is taken from the jaw, hip or tibia (below the knee.)

Sinus bone grafts are also performed to replace bone in the posterior upper jaw.